Military/ Law Enforcement

Military/ Law Enforcement

 

Ed Staniowski

Lieutenant-Colonel Ed Staniowski joined the Canadian Forces Primary Reserves in 1985 as an Officer, following a ten-year career playing Professional Hockey in the NHL.  He was selected as the St. Louis Blues first pick in the 1975 draft.  As a member of the Canadian Forces, LCol Staniowski has served on three United Nations and NATO Peacekeeping and Peace Enforcement Missions including Bosnia, Croatia and the Middle East.  All of the overseas tours were with the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry.  On foreign and domestic operations, LCol Staniowski has served as a Staff Officer at the Unit and Formation level.  Staff positions include: Senior Military Liaison Officer for the CF Joint Task Force HQ during the 2002 G8 Summit in Kananaskis and in 2003, as the Military Assistant to the Chairman of the Steering Committee for the Multi-National Stand-by High Readiness Brigade for the United Nations Operations (SHIRBRIG).

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Chad Hennings

Although best known for his role with America's Team, Chad Hennings' successful career began long before his professional football career.  An accomplished lineman in high school, Hennings was offered full scholarships for Universities across the Nation.  However, he chose to attend the U.S. Air Force Academy, where he racked up numerous honors academically as well as on the gridiron.  His exemplary achievements put him at the top of many draft lists and earned him a spot on the Dallas Cowboys' roster, but Hennings postponed his entry into the NFL to fullfill his commitment to the U.S. Air Force.  He entered the Euro-NATO Joint Jet Pilot Training Program and soon found himself at the controls of the A-10 Thunderbolt.  During his four years of service in the U.S. Air Force, Hennings flew 45 missions in support of Operation Provide Support in Northern Iraq, receiving two Ariel Achievement Medals, a Humanitarian Award and Outstanding Unit Award for his actions in service.  After his discharge, Hennings joined the Dallas Cowboys in a starting position as a defensive lineman.  He spent his entire 9 years in the NFL with the Cowboys, retiring with three Super Bowl rings.

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John Banaszek

Between 1978 and 1980, Banaszak started 45 regular season games at defensive end on a pair of Pittsburgh Super Bowl Championship teams (XIII & XIV). During Super Bowl XIII, Banaszak recorded six tackles, including a pair of sacks, and a fumble recovery in a 35-31 victory over the Dallas Cowboys, which garnered him Defensive Player of the Game honors. In the following Super Bowl against the Los Angeles Rams, Banaszak finished with five tackles and a sack in a 31-19 Steelers victory.  Banaszak took a unique route to the NFL via his schooling.  John enlisted in the United States Marine Corps and spent two years in the service between high school and University.
 

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Johnny Bower

Bower grew up in rural Saskatchewan, the only boy in a family of nine children. He was dirt poor and never had the proper equipment. He made his goalie pads from an old mattress; he made pucks, "cow pies," from horse manure; his dad would look for suitably crooked tree branches to shave into sticks; a friend gave him his first pair of skates because his father couldn't afford to buy him a pair; and still he refined his game to become one of the best goalies of all time. In 1940, when he was 15 years old, Bower lied about his age for the first time, though not the last, in order to enlist in the Army. He was sent to a training camp in British Columbia and was eventually called up by the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders and shipped to England. Four years later, he became sick during his service and was discharged in 1944, at which time he resumed his junior career with Prince Albert.  After he retired in 1970 as the oldest goalie ever to play in the NHL, Bower remained with the Leafs for many years as a scout and then goalie coach, putting the pads on and helping Leaf goalies in practice. At one injury-riddled time during the 1979-1980 season, he came within a whisker, at age 56, of dressing as the team's backup. A member of the Hockey Hall of Fame, Bower is one of only a select few to have his number honored by the Leafs.

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Howie Meeker

In 1943 at the tender age of 18, Howie enlisted in the Canadian Armed Forces.  In July of the same year, he boarded The Queen Mary and headed overseas accompanied by his cohorts in the CRWC.  During a training session in England, where the troops were supposed to have used plastic grenades, a live grenade was inadvertently thrown and exploded between his legs.  He remained in the hospital for 8 weeks before returning to his troop and returned home from his tour of duty in  December of 1945. Upon his return from overseas he to pursued his dream of playing for the Toronto Maple Leafs.  In the 1946-47 season, Meeker captured the Calder Memorial Trophy as NHL Rookie of the Year.  That season, he scored a record 5 goals in a single season.  He was a Stanley Cup winner three times in 1947, '48 and '49. 

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Bob Motley

Bob Motley is a rare historical figure at best.   He is a living legend, the only living umpire from the historical Negro Baseball Leagues.  Born in Autaugaville, Alabama in 1923, Bob Motley has lived an extraordinary and colorful life.  Ironically, it was while serving as a Marine during World War II where Motley found his passion, umpiring.  From a few stints as an arbitrator for military pick-up games amongst the distressed soldiers, he would eventually find his way to the Negro American League after being Honorably discharged and receiving a Purple Heart.

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Pedro Sierra

Pedro left his native Cuba at age 16 to come to America to play in the Negro Leagues with the Indianapolis Clowns.  It was with the Clowns in 1954 that Pedro played for Hall of Fame legend Oscar Charleston. In 1959, The Washington Senators signed Sierra and shortly thereafter he was drafted into the US Army.  It was while in the service that he helped his team with the U.S. 4th Army Championship with a 17-5 record and a 1.75 ERA.  After his tour of duty ended in 1962, Pedro played in the Minnesota Twins farm system until 1966.  In 1967, he went to play in the Provinciale League in Quebec, Canada where he went 14-3 in 1969 winning his team’s MVP award and finishing second in voting for the league’s MVP.  In 1970, the legendary Ted Williams gave Pedro a try-out with the Senators again and he was assigned to AA ball and later became the big club’s batting practice pitcher.  He ended his playing career with time spent playing in Panama and Mexico.

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